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Climate change to destroy all of Earth’s coral reefs by 2100

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Coral Reef
climate change could devastate nearly all of Earth's coral reef habitats by 2100

New research says climate change could devastate nearly all of Earth’s coral reef habitats by 2100.

Among the existing, around 70-90% of coral reefs are likely to disappear in the next 20 years because of warming oceans, acidic water, and pollution, said scientists from the University of Hawaii Manoa.

They made their findings public on last Monday at an ocean sciences conference.

A few ecological activists and coral reef researchers have been working closely on the restoration of coral. They tried to grow live corals in a lab, and then put them back into aquatic environments to restore dying reefs.

But the researchers warned, this may not be adequate to save Earth’s coral reefs.

The new study made cluster on the ocean areas that would be best suited to this type of coral restoration. They also took into consideration factors like acidity, water temperature, human population density and fishing frequency.

After investigating the world’s oceans, they reached a serious remark: “By 2100, few to zero suitable coral habitats will remain.”

Unfortunately, existing ocean parts where coral reefs live today won’t be healthy by 2045. And, the circumstance of these environments is only likely to get worse by 2100, according to the team’s simulations.

Only a few sites will be viable for the restoration of a coral reef by 2100, like portions of Baja California and the Red Sea — even these aren’t suitable territories for reef because they’re close to rivers.

The researchers warned that human-made climate change was the big killer, a small part of the larger threat.

“Cleaning up the beaches and battling pollution are praiseworthy. But, we need to continue those efforts,” Setter said in that release.

“But tackling climate change is really what we need to be advocating for shielding corals.”

Coral reef die-off

Earlier, scientists warned that the world’s reefs are heading for “massive death”  as ocean warming and acidification destroy entire swaths of reefs.

The Great Barrier Reef is a case for a large scale of “bleaching” events by above-average water temperatures in the last two decades.

Then, a drastic marine heatwave in 2016 and 2017 has destroyed about half of the corals on the Great Barrier Reef.

The Great Barrier Reef is such habitat for a diverse range of marine life. 

Moreover, the extinction could cause ecological collapse as third of all sea species depend on reefs, experts warn.

Also, coral reefs protect the shorelines and coastal infrastructure.

In recent years, activists are in the quest of saving the reefs. Almost nothing will be unless we take drastic action on climate change.

Other reports

Climate Change and River salinity in coastal areas.

Climate change causes substantial changes in river salinity. Accordingly, it leads to the crisis of drinking water as well as the shortage of irrigation water. 

Shortly, the changes in river salinity will unpleasantly affect the productivity of many capture fisheries. Negatively, it will affect the wild habitats of freshwater fish and giant prawns. 

The health of Mangrove trees is declining.

A new study says the health of mangrove trees of the Sundarbans has significantly declined over the last 30 years due to salinity increase. 

Consequently, the decline in health could critically hamper the ability to spring back. It makes it prone to unexpected climate-related hazards.

Also, the salinity increase in the water may induce a shift in the Sunderbans mangrove forest from Sundari to Gewa and Guran. 

Accordingly, Bagerhat, Barguna, Barisal, Bhola, Khulna, Jhalokati, Pirojpur, and Satkhira districts will be most adversely affected.

Climate Change, Soil Salinity in Coastal
Bangladesh.

Soon, the salinity level in the soil will surge in many areas of Barisal, Chittagong, and Khulna districts significantly. A study on the soil of the coastal regions of Bangladesh, the Soil Research Development Institute projects a median increase of 26% in salinity by 2050, with increases over 55% in the most affected areas.

Zulker Naeen

Climate Journalist

Zulker Naeen is a South Asia Fellow at Climate Tracker and freelance climate journalist from Bangladesh. He has three years of experience in the field. Zulker developed all his courses with the support of other experienced Climate Tracker staff credited on the course landing page.

As a young climate advocate, his fellowship aims to share knowledge of climate change. Climate Tracker is a global media network closely works on Climate Change.

Climate Change Journalism Workshop in Bangladesh Now

Covid-19 Pandemic and Climate Change

Ocean acidification and marine ecosystem

Climate change to destroy all of Earth’s coral reefs by 2100

Climate-induced soil salinity affects coastal Bangladesh

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Climate Change
Saltwater intrusion, Changing Climate Scenario, affects coastal Bangladesh.

Climate change is a key reason to increase river salinity leading to shortages of drinking water and irrigation. It is bringing a substantial difference in the aquatic ecosystems in the coastal areas of Bangladesh.

In the coastal areas of Bangladesh, salinity intrusion in soil may lead to a deteriorating yield by 15.6% of high-harvesting-variety rice and reduce the income of farmers expressively.

In the background of climate change, we know, the coastal population is more exposed to saltwater intrusion. These populations on the “frontline” of climate change because of the constant sea-level rise beyond 2100, even if greenhouse gas emissions remain stable today. 

Therefore, Bangladesh must comprehend the potential impacts and begin planning to cope with them.

However, most research has focused on the long-run effects of the sea level rise and associated losses from heightened cyclone-induced surges. 

So, we need to investigate the level of higher salinity from saltwater intrusion, and its impact on livelihoods and adaptation alternatives.

To look more closely at the impacts of climate change on saltwater intrusion, the World Bank researched on the coastal region of Bangladesh. 

Already, they found the coastal area is facing problems from salinization. And, the situation is deteriorating.

Climate Change and River salinity in coastal areas.

Climate change causes substantial changes in river salinity. Accordingly, it leads to the crisis of drinking water as well as the shortage of irrigation water. 

Shortly, the changes in river salinity will unpleasantly affect the productivity of many capture fisheries. Negatively, it will affect the wild habitats of freshwater fish and giant prawns. 

The health of Mangrove trees is declining.

A new study says the health of mangrove trees of the Sundarbans has significantly declined over the last 30 years due to salinity increase. 

Consequently, the decline in health could critically hamper the ability to spring back. It makes it prone to unexpected climate-related hazards.

Also, the salinity increase in the water may induce a shift in the Sunderbans mangrove forest from Sundari to Gewa and Guran. 

Accordingly, Bagerhat, Barguna, Barisal, Bhola, Khulna, Jhalokati, Pirojpur, and Satkhira districts will be most adversely affected.

Climate Change, Soil Salinity in Coastal
Bangladesh.

Soon, the salinity level in the soil will surge in many areas of Barisal, Chittagong, and Khulna districts significantly. A study on the soil of the coastal regions of Bangladesh, the Soil Research Development Institute projects a median increase of 26% in salinity by 2050, with increases over 55% in the most affected areas.

Impacts on rice production due to climate change.

Accordingly, the climate-induced soil salinity is impacting on the output of high-harvesting-variety rice. As a result, the rice harvest is likely to decline by 15.6% in nine coastal unions, where the soil salinity will exceed around four decisions per meter by 2050. 

Now, the farmers are earning less from rice production in several regions, along with the losses of 10.5% Barisal and 7.5 in Chittagong, earlier. 

Consequently, many unions are suffering from significant yield losses and substantial price reductions from rising salinity. 

Livelihoods are in threat in a changing climate.

Already, the salinity has turned the household status to the most harmful level. The poverty impact is striking one that the economic situation of a coastal household is in the bottom 20% rises six-fold, from 8% to 56%.

Therefore, the Bangladesh government is trying to cope up with the adverse effects of a changing climate. As we know, the country is one of the frontiers which is affected by climate change.

 Zulker Naeen

Climate Journalist

Zulker Naeen is a South Asia Fellow at Climate Tracker and freelance climate journalist from Bangladesh. He has three years of experience in the field. Zulker developed all his courses with the support of other experienced Climate Tracker staff credited on the course landing page.

As a young climate advocate, his fellowship aims to share knowledge of climate change. Climate Tracker is a global media network closely works on Climate Change.

Climate Change Journalism Workshop in Bangladesh Now

Covid-19 Pandemic and Climate Change

Ocean acidification and marine ecosystem

Sundarbans can regenerate after the damage by cyclone Amphan

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Sundarbans
Sundarbans can regenerate after the damage by cyclone Amphan

We know the Sundarbans has its capacity to regenerate. The damage after the Amphan is possible to recover like the recovery after the destruction by cyclone Bulbul.

The cyclonic storm Amphan has uprooted around 12,358 trees.  So far, the forest department incurred losses in infrastructure worth Tk 21,500,000, according to a damage determination report of the forest department.

Garans were the victims of the cyclone, whilst the monetary value of all the broken trees is Tk1,010,000.

However, according to the forest department’s report, no wild animals were killed during the passing over of the cyclone.

Last year, the mangrove forest lost 4,589 trees because of the cyclone Bulbul. The forest department had to carry on an infrastructural loss up to Tk 62, 85,000 then.

Authorities ban cutting down of trees so that the forest could regenerate.

Md Bashirul Al Mamun, Divisional Forest Officer (DFO) of the Sundarbans West Zone, said: “Cutting down of all sorts of trees in this mangrove forest has been banned. Sundarbans has successfully regenerated after the attack of cyclone Bulbul. Similarly, it will happen in this case; we will only have to renovate our infrastructures.”

Even though instances of casualties has reported during two earlier storms in 2007 and 2009. A thousand people survived as the Sundarbans stood as a shield between the inhabitants of the coastal districts and the fierce winds.

However, the Sundarbans has saved Bangladesh again, which it has been doing for hundreds of years.

Similarly, this time, it took the blow of super-cyclone Amphan and protected us from severe devastation.

The Sundarbans is not only an ecosystem is torn, rather it is an unspoken “trouble-shooter” addressing our social challenges.

We were already overwhelmed by two of the main challenges—climate change and biodiversity loss. What is more, mangroves are such natural systems that can help us tackle both challenges.

As we continue facing a climate crisis and biodiversity loss in catastrophic proportions can be protecting the Sundarbans and nature, as a whole, be our priority now?

We may justify investing in the protection, restoration, and expansion of the mangroves. However, the return from preserving and restoring mangrove is ten times the investment.

Unfortunately, Sundari tree, the main mangrove species in the Sundarbans is becoming unhealthy gradually.

However, there is no significant decline in the number of mangroves in the Sundarbans for the last 30 years. However, there is evidence of a 25% health decline of the mangrove trees.

It is due to the effect of increased salinity and the continuing effects of climate change. These could critically hamper its ability to reborn.

A satellite-based data-driven study on world’s mangrove system brought new findings to say that the dreadful effects of climate change could severely hamper the growths of Sundari tree.

Around 1.44 million cubic meters of Sundari trees have been lost to “top-dying disease in the last 30 years,” experts said.

Top-dying disease among the Sundari, heart-rot disease among the Pashur, and dieback disease in the Kewara, are behind the trees’ rapid decline.

The expert said, the increases of saline water are the key reason, and this is happening in the Sundarbans.

Unfavourably, the Sundari tree is less tolerant of high salinity levels than another mangrove species.

“There is evidence of a decline in the health of about 25% of the mangrove trees,” said study author Katie Awty-Carroll of Department of Geography and Earth Sciences, Aberystwyth University, Wales.

Awty-Carroll and his team observed along with a 30-year time series of Landsat data of the entire Sundarbans.

However, it is hard to know the proper explanations behind this decline in mangrove health, the scientists think the long-term decline in mangrove health may be linked to the impacts of increased salinity on the Sundari tree.

Also, rising sea levels are increasing salinity, with adverse effects on the damage from severe cyclones mean that the defensive capacity of the Sundarbans could be reduced in future years.

This study also explored the damage of Sidr, which made landfall in Bangladesh in November 2007.

“We estimate that around 11% of the Sundarbans forest was damaged by Sidr, which is lower than other estimates,” said Awty-Carroll.

Meanwhile, this study also revealed that the effects of Sidr were still apparent more than 10 years after the cyclone made landfall.

Besides, the super-cyclone Amphan brought significant damage over the entire Sundarbans region.

Accordingly, this suggests that major cyclones could decrease the health of the mangroves for a long.

We know, Climate change has to lead to an increase in the salinity of the water and soil of the Sundarbans.

Earlier, it was a finding of 30ppm of salinity in the water—which declines the disease-prevention capacity of the trees.

Zulker Naeen

Climate Journalist

Zulker Naeen is a South Asia Fellow at Climate Tracker and freelance climate journalist from Bangladesh. He has three years of experience in the field. Zulker developed all his courses with the support of other experienced Climate Tracker staff credited on the course landing page.

As a young climate advocate, his fellowship aims to share knowledge of climate change.

Climate Tracker is a global media network closely works on Climate Change.

Does Cyclone Amphan badly damages Sundarbans like Sidr?

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Sundarbans
Does Cyclone Amphan badly damages Sundarbans like Sidr?

Super cyclone Amphan battered West Bengal and Bangladesh’s coastal area and badly damaged parts of the Sundarbans, the largest mangrove forest in the world, spread across India and Bangladesh.

The cyclone has already hit the coastal district of Khulna with strong winds and heavy rainfall.

Streets waterlogged, trees uprooted and houses damaged due to strong winds and heavy rain as Amphan crossed West Bengal-Bangladesh coast between Digha (West Bengal) and Hatiya Islands (Bangladesh) across Sunderbans.

The cyclonic storm Amphan has uprooted around 12,300 trees, mostly Garans, in the Bangladeshi part of the Sundarbans mangrove forest.

Vulnerable people were evacuated from the coastal and forest areas ahead of the cyclone. The fate of wild animals found in the Sundarban would have suffered the most in the aftermath of Cyclone Amphan.

However, the Sundarbans has saved Bangladesh again, which it has been doing for hundreds of years.

Similarly, this time, it took the blow of super-cyclone Amphan and protected us from severe devastation.

When it comes to saving people from coastal flooding, Bangladesh is one of the top three countries in the world getting the most benefit from its mangroves.

According to a recent study, a 20-km mangrove stretch could give more than USD 250 million-flood protection benefits a year. Can we only partly imagine the importance of the Sundarbans to Bangladesh?

The Sundarbans is not only an ecosystem is torn rather it is an unspoken “trouble-shooter” addressing our social challenges.

We were already overwhelmed by two of the main challenges—climate change and biodiversity loss. What is more, mangroves are such natural systems that can help us tackle both challenges.

As we continue facing a climate crisis and biodiversity loss in catastrophic proportions can be protecting the Sundarbans and nature, as a whole, be our priority now?

Like other countries with mangroves, Bangladesh is also enjoying tremendous benefits out of them.

Globally, mangroves give us USD 65 billion value of coastal flood protection each year. They yearly give us USD 50 billion non-market benefits from fisheries, forestry, and recreation.

We may justify investing in the protection, restoration, and expansion of the mangroves. However, the return from preserving and restoring mangrove is 10 times the investment. How would we value thousands of years of evolution of mangroves? What price can we put on a mangrove when it is the home of hundreds?

Unfortunately, Sundari tree, the main mangrove species in the Sundarbans is becoming unhealthy gradually.

However, there is no significant decline in the number of mangroves in the Sundarbans for the last 30 years. However, there is evidence of a 25% health decline of the mangrove trees.

It is due to the effect of increased salinity and the continuing effects of climate change. These could critically hamper its ability to reborn.

A satellite-based data-driven study on world’s mangrove system brought new findings to say that the dreadful effects of climate change could severely hamper the growths of Sundari tree.

Around 1.44 million cubic meters of Sundari trees have been lost to “top-dying disease in the last 30 years,” experts said.

Top-dying disease among the Sundari, heart-rot disease among the Pashur, and dieback disease in the Kewara, are behind the trees’ rapid decline.

The expert said, the increases of saline water are the key reason, and this is happening in the Sundarbans.

Unfavourably, the Sundari tree is less tolerant of high salinity levels than another mangrove species.

“There is evidence of a decline in the health of about 25% of the mangrove trees,” said study author Katie Awty-Carroll of Department of Geography and Earth Sciences, Aberystwyth University, Wales.

Awty-Carroll and his team observed along with a 30-year time series of Landsat data of the entire Sundarbans.

However, it is hard to know the proper explanations behind this decline in mangrove health, the scientists think the long-term decline in mangrove health may be linked to the impacts of increased salinity on the Sundari tree.

Also, rising sea levels are increasing salinity, with adverse effects on the damage from severe cyclones mean that the defensive capacity of the Sundarbans could be reduced in future years.

This study also explored the damage of Sidr, which made landfall in Bangladesh in November 2007.

“We estimate that around 11% of the Sundarbans forest was damaged by Sidr, which is lower than other estimates,” said Awty-Carroll.

Meanwhile, this study also revealed that the effects of Sidr were still apparent more than 10 years after the cyclone made landfall.

Besides, the super-cyclone Amphan brought significant damage over the entire Sundarbans region.

Accordingly, this suggests that major cyclones could decrease the health of the mangroves for a long.

We know, Climate change has to lead to an increase in the salinity of the water and soil of the Sundarbans.

Earlier, it was a finding of 30ppm of salinity in the water—which declines the disease-prevention capacity of the trees.

Zulker Naeen

Climate Journalist

Zulker Naeen is a South Asia Fellow at Climate Tracker and freelance climate journalist from Bangladesh. He has three years of experience in the field. Zulker developed all his courses with the support of other experienced Climate Tracker staff credited on the course landing page.

 As a young climate advocate, his fellowship aims to share knowledge of climate change.

 Climate Tracker is a global media network closely works on Climate Change.

Climate Change Journalism Workshop in Bangladesh Now

Covid-19 Pandemic and Climate Change

Ocean acidification and marine ecosystem

Does Cyclone Amphan badly damages Sundarbans like Sidr?

Is Climate Journalism Course affordable in Bangladesh?

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Climate Journalism
Is Climate Journalism Course affordable

Climate Journalism Course is now affordable which is unbelievable too. Moreover, this course aims to enhance understanding of climate change impacts on biodiversity.

Fortunately, this online course is designed for passionate writer and next journalists with limited experience engaging with issues on climate change and ecosystem services interactions with biodiversity locally, nationally and internationally.

The course participants assess the climate change-related issues relevant to available articles in biodiversity, identify the topics and then follow appropriate writing style. 

Participants also develop a writing skill to relate the human-climate fact within 1 to 2 months after the training workshop.

Applicants to this training course need not demonstrate prior experience with journalism and how skills gained will be utilized after the workshop.

Communicating Climate Change is to promote key knowledge on climate change issues and to cover the most basic journalism skills – in the context of Bangladesh. We’re particularly opening this extensive course to prepare the next climate journalist. 

You may not a subject matter expert, but you will become familiar with the key concepts, approaches, and climate journalism staples. 

To promote Climate Journalism in Bangladesh, we’re particularly opening this course on climate change to prepare the next journalist. With this great objective, we are going to run a three-month campaign to introduce this course among students with an extensive collaboration of the interested partners.

Moreover, this campaign aims to teach students between graduate and post-graduate. That is why; we are emphasizing their pattern of seeking information, also to influence them to enrol this course by ensuring their active participation.

A social media campaign will run to promote this course. University faculty, expert, practitioners, and journalist will engage with this initiative. 

Why climate journalism is facing difficulties in Bangladesh?  

The knowledge of climate change among University students is relatively insignificant in Bangladesh, that understanding is making them less interested. This is why we are focusing on 20-25 years aged university students, the key audience, also the future leader of the nation to keep an active role in society. We better know, their pattern of seeking information is through educational institutes, teachers, and social media platforms.

Finally, our objective is to influence 100 students of 20-25-year-old age throughout the nation to enrol this course for their future between 1 June and 31 August 2020.

Participants will enrol in this online course with a registration fee. After finishing the course materials, the participants will have to join in the online quiz or complete the assignment. Finally, the participants will get the certificate. This course will start from 20th June 2020. 

Key objectives of this course:

  1. To give basic knowledge on climate change issues
  2. To guide the participants on key climate journalism topics
  3. To launch a certification process for participants who wish to publish an article as a trainee journalist.

A summary of this curriculum—

  • Learning: Climate Change Issues in the context of Bangladesh 
  • Skills Development: Climate Journalism Staples
  • Content Training: Making the Climate-human Link
  • Evaluation: Online Exam
  • Reward: Certification

What the participants will learn

  • Basic Knowledge on Climate Change
  • Climate Issues
  • Climate and Health
  • Climate Change and its impact on Bangladesh
  • Climate Journalism Training
  • Climate Change Communication in Social Media

Instructor

Zulker Naeen

Climate Journalist

Zulker Naeen is a South Asia Fellow at Climate Tracker and freelance climate journalist from Bangladesh. He has three years of experience in the field. Zulker developed all his courses with the support of other experienced Climate Tracker staff credited on the course landing page.

 As a young climate advocate, his fellowship aims to share knowledge of climate change.

 Climate Tracker is a global media network closely works on Climate Change.

Climate Change Journalism Workshop in Bangladesh Now

Covid-19 Pandemic and Climate Change

Ocean acidification and marine ecosystem

Is Climate Journalism Course affordable in Bangladesh?

Climate Change Journalism Workshop in Bangladesh Now

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Climate Change
Communicating Climate Change

Communicating Climate: A Climate Change Journalism Workshop is to promote key knowledge on climate change issues and to cover the most basic journalism skills – pitching, fact-finding, interviewing, data visualization, and more – in the context of Bangladesh.

Key objectives of this course:

  1. To give basic knowledge on climate change issues
  2. To guide the participants on key climate journalism topics
  3. To launch a certification process for participants who wish to publish an article as a trainee journalist.

A summary of this curriculum—

  1. Learning: Climate Change Issues in the context of Bangladesh
  2. Skills Development: Climate Journalism Staples
  3. Content Training: Making the Climate-human Link
  4. Evaluation: Online Exam
  5. Reward: Certification

What the participants will learn

  • Basic Knowledge on Climate Change
  • Climate Change Issues
  • Climate and Health
  • Climate Change and its impact on Bangladesh
  • Climate Journalism Training
  • Climate Change Communication in Social Media

Is there any course prerequisites?

There is no course prerequisite.

Climate Journalism in Bangladesh

As a campaigner of Climate Journalism in Bangladesh, we’re particularly opening a course on climate change to prepare the next journalist. With this great objective, we are going to run a three-month campaign to introduce this course among students with an extensive collaboration of the interested partners.

This campaign is designed to reach the students between graduate and post-graduate emphasizing their pattern of seeking information, also to influence them to enrol this course by ensuring their active participation.

A social media campaign is going to be developed to promote this course. University faculty, expert, practitioners, and journalist will engage with this initiative. Students will partake in the online course by a registration process. After the complication of the course materials, the participants have to join in the online quiz. 

Finally, this initiative will award the winners with a certificate. 

#Context

The knowledge of climate change among University students is relatively insignificant in Bangladesh, that understanding is making them less interested. 

#Community Partners and Stakeholders

Students, Teachers, Universities, Publishers, Media, Co-organizer.                                                                                        

# Priority Audience: Students

20-25 years aged university students, the key audience, also the future leader of the nation to keep an active role in society. Their pattern of seeking information is through educational institutes, teachers, and social media platforms.

Communication Objective

To influence 100 students of 20-25-year-old age throughout the nation to enrol this course for their future between 1 June and 31 August 2020.

#Strategies

Course Development:  To develop an easygoing course for the student.

Online Contest:  To arrange an online contest to offer the course.

Video: To make a few online sessions on the mandatory topic.

Digital Campaign:  To design a complete digital campaign plan for all social media platforms. 

Awards:  To award certificate for the winners.  

Participatory gifts: To engage co-sponsors to offer various gifts for the standard participants.

#Course Module

Section 1 | Introduction

#Introduction to the overall course

It will try to explain to the participants why climate change topics are easier to understand with our course.

Section 2 | Introduction to Climate Change

#A brief introduction to Climate Change

It will try to give the participants a basic knowledge on climate change and related topic thus they get an overview.

Section 3 | Climate Change Issues

#An introduction to Climate Change related issues

Wildfires, cyclones, and infectious diseases are the key topics for participants to understand how to highlight the human-interest story behind climate change.

Section 4 | Climate and Health

#Health challenges and Climate Adaptation

It will introduce the health challenges, as well as the opportunities, that can be associated with climate change. In addition, it will give you a brief idea on Adaptation: Minimizing climate risks to health, building resilience against climate effects, building climate-resilient health systems, and health response to climate change.

Section 5 | Climate Change and its impact on Bangladesh

#Existing climate challenges in Bangladesh

It will introduce the existing challenges associated with climate change in Bangladesh

Section 6 | A to Z of Climate Journalism Know-How’s

#How to write as a Climate Journalist

It will inspire the participants to be a climate journalist. Participants will learn how to effectively pitch a story to the editors about climate.

Also, they will find the important facts, time-sensitive, identifiable characters, the central conflict, and the identifiable theme. Moreover, they will learn how to searching for sources. In addition, they will learn how to ask questions for the Interview. Again, this section will also try to learn two-three tools on how they better know data visualization.

Section 7 | Climate Topics for writings

#Explanation: Few articles related to climate change

It will explain 10 published articles on climate issues covered by the Climate Journalist.

Section 8 | Climate Change Communication in Social Media

#Act as a Climate Advocate in Social Media  

It will explain how to use social media to design a campaign on climate change issues and act as a climate advocate. 

Climate Change Journalism Workshop in Bangladesh Now

Strategic Insight in Three Circles

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Strategic Insight
Strategic insight in three circles

Writing strategic insight is crucial for every business; however, a set of questions may ease that analytical task.

Moreover, a communication practitioner may help your internal analyst team to design a rigorous form to acquire the real picture.

A company always tries to build a distinct competitive advantage to grow more and to be profitable over the long term. A very few have a clear idea of what that really means. The various language of strategy creates confusion among them, as they are not oriented with the technical details of analytical tools.

We would like to tell them to draw three circles.

Those circles, positioned in the proper relationship to one another, provide an excellent visual representation of what strategy—both internal and external—means.

Hundreds of leaders have accepted this strategy concept by using this simple tool. They take it back to their organizations, where it often becomes part of the decision-making process.

Let’s try this exercise by engaging an executive team. First, the team should think intensely about what customers value and why. Identifying deeper values can ease the decision-making process and create new opportunities for value creation. The first circle thus signifies the team’s consensus on most valuable customers or customers’ needs.

Company’s Offerings, Customers’ Needs.

The second circle represents the team’s view of how customers accept the company’s offerings. Here, the two circles overlap indicates how well the company’s offerings are meeting customers’ needs.

Even in mature industries, customers get a chance to express their needs or problems in conversations with companies. Very Often, the customers’ unexpressed problems turn into growth opportunities.

The third circle represents the team’s view of how customers perceive the competitors’ offerings.

Company’s Offerings, Competitors’ Offerings, Customers’ Needs.

Each area within these three circles is strategically essential.

However, A, B, and C are vital to building a competitive advantage. Also, your team should prepare separate questions for each circle.

For A: How significant and sustainable are our advantages? Are they creating distinctive capabilities?

For B: Are we providing well in the area of parity?

For C: How can we breach our competitors’ advantages?

The team should design a strategic plan over the company’s competitive advantages and assess them by asking customers.

The process can yield surprising insights, such as how many opportunities for growth exists in the white space (E).

Another insight might create values for the company or its competitors that not requires for customers now (D, F, or G).

However, the critical disclosure is often that area A, designed as massive by the company, turns out to be little in customers’ eyes.

Strategic Insight in Three Circles

Covid-19 Pandemic and Climate Change

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Covid-19
Covid-19 Pandemic and Climate Change

The Covid-19 pandemic is still making its way around the world, and it will remain a few more times before it’s over. However, at the early stage, we get some lessons on how to take preparation to deal with the future problem of climate change impacts soon after it.

Significantly, the Covid-19 virus outbreak has more to do with how we have neglected our ecosystems rather than because of human-induced climate change.

Today, it proves the coexistence of this pandemic and climate change.

The first lesson is about when to take action when faced with a future problem. Leaders tend to wait for the problem to occur before taking action, despite having warning by scientists earlier about the imminence of the problem. Even at this early stage, it is clear that initial responses to be better prepared for the problem before it occurs is much more effective.

However, it means our leaders don’t accept what the scientists warn them earlier and asked for policies that may seem too much then, and it was a warning even before the problem arises. However, as we know now, it is better to overreact before the problem arises so that the problem can put under control before the problem becomes a crisis.

Waiting for the problem to manifest itself may lead many lives to lose unnecessarily. This is what is now playing out in Italy and Spain. It may lead to this similar case in the United States and the United Kingdom too. Let’s hope this not happens in Bangladesh.

In the second lesson, we couldn’t stop the entry of foreign migrants. Of course, we can try to do so, and somehow it may even delay this problem.

Equally, indeed, we can only try to protect ourselves at the personal and household level. Still, if others get start affecting around us, then we will also be its victim sooner or later.

The success of tackling the pandemic in Taiwan, Singapore, and South Korea, has already shown how collective action from everyone in the country, together with proactive leaders, can overcome the challenges.

The third lesson is one end of the scale.

Even though the Covid-19 pandemic seems a devastating one now, its impacts will pale in comparison with the potential effects of climate change, which are yet to come.

Hence, the early action to prevent the worst impacts, including adaptation as well as mitigation, must keep in consideration by all if we hope to minimize the adverse effects.

Every action by individuals or any bodies will count towards reducing the inevitable damage from climate change that is yet to come.

The fourth lesson drives us to look at our economical costs and behavioral changes.

Here, there are indeed a couple of positive lessons. Almost all people in an entire country are now ready to change their behavior quite drastically if they have to. It is a hopeful sign going forward.

On the economic front, there has already been a widespread disruption of the global economy. Still, some unintended benefits include a significant reduction in air pollution as well as greenhouse gases.

While such economic disruption is not desirable and we will recover from it soon, it is worth thinking about whether the recovery is possible in a much more eco-friendly manner.

The final lesson has to do with the inevitable economic chaos and recession that is starting to happen already and will get a lot worse before it gets better.

Bangladesh is likely to see significant negative impacts on manufacturing, exports, and possibly even our food production going forward.

Even the worst is yet to come.  Moreover, we must take preparation for the immediate economic downturn as well as think about the future path to recovery once the worst is over.

It applies to the global economy and the silver lining in this Covid-19 pandemic, which is most relevant for tackling climate change.

Equally, it is an opportunity to rebuild the post-pandemic economy as a green one that doesn’t allow the destruction of nature. Let us hope that all global leaders are up to the challenge.

Covid-19 Pandemic and Climate Change

Bangladesh Lube Market Database

1
Lube Market
Bangladesh Lube Market Database

Zulker Naeen, as a profile supervisor of “Bangladesh Lube Market”, gives the current info via an industry-leading paper database.

Any person active in business requires unrelenting expertise as well as information in the type of market understandings.

The special records are a vital argumentation as well as a decision-making resource for suppliers, financiers, and anyone thinking about developments of the expanding lube market.

Moreover, it supplies an in-depth independent assessment of the ended up industrial and also auto lubricating substances market.

Also, it recognizes market chances and challenges for lube providers, additive providers, and also base stock manufacturers.

Existing reporting designs are now out of the ark. Existing reports speak a lot more, provide the least insights. From their articles, it’s unusual to get a real-time photo over the marketplace.

That is why the profile of “Bangladesh Lube Market” frequently argues with the records by the papers.

Here is Zulker Naeen. This identification is neither a specific observer neither an author. Instead, it is a portfolio on Bangladesh Lube Market Database.

This portfolio exclusively releases observant records on this market.

It has actually currently consisted of more than 100 write-ups.

Lately, the successive report determined the growth of “Bangladesh Lube Market” which is a rapid one.

Earlier, this portfolio highlighted the growth of this market.

Its research-oriented facts have actually made it a mouthpiece of this trade for the last four years.

Those who rely on market understandings are interacting with this portfolio.

It has actually functioned as an advocate of a couple of keeps in mind lube brands. With excellent success, it has actually finished with the brand positioning of international brand names.

It thinks that the lube profession is not restricted to business just, it’s a market.

As a watchdog, this profile has actually created the term ‘lubricants racks of Bangladesh’ to release various insights. Presently, a dedicated group is working closely on this principle.

Accordingly, this portfolio solely publishes market understandings, existing market fads, as well as market forecasts naturally.

Likewise, it publishes articles on the automotive industry.

Bangladesh Lube Market Database

Ocean acidification and marine ecosystem

8
marine ecosystems
Ocean acidification and marine ecosystems

When carbon dioxide combines with seawater, it produces carbonic acid which increases the acidity of the water. And, it is happening for many years and causes uneven ocean ecosystems.

Since the thriving industrial revolution, the betting on fossil fuels has caused an excessive release of carbon dioxide into the atmosphere. And, it is being absorbed by our earth’s oceans.

In the seawater, chemical reactions occur with carbon dioxide that lowers seawater pH, reduces carbonate concentration, and reduces saturation states of biologically important calcium carbonate materials.

Consequently, the ocean’s chemistry becomes more acidic, carbonate ions face difficultly to form. The carbonate ions are used by marine creatures, for synthesize their calcium carbonate shells and skeletons.

As the pH of the ocean changes, the ocean becomes unconcentrated with these minerals, which affects the creatures to maintain their shells.

Since the growth of industries, the pH balance of ocean waters has dropped by 0.1 pH units, equivalent to a 30% increase of water acidity.

The acidity has never dropped down below 0.6 units since the last 300 million years. This is likely to increase more if we continue to burn fossil fuels frequently.

Ocean acidification and the harsh reality of the marine ecosystem

Ocean acidification may alter the ecosystems of millions of years. It has the influence to contaminate shellfish that humans consume and sicken marine life.

Right now, the ocean is on pace to become 150% more acidic by 2100. And this ocean acidification is an unswerving consequence of human-made carbon emissions.

Humans’ continual release of carbon monoxide into the atmosphere has led to ocean acidification.

This process has to lead to the destruction of many marine ecosystems and the plants. One of the most beautiful occurrences in nature — the coral reefs — are dying.

Coral reefs used to be a massive hub of life and colour underneath the water hosting a plethora of organisms within. Now many are bleached white due to higher water temperatures and have sustained damage to their structure due to increased acidification.

Coral bleaching occurs in which corals lose their colour due to extrinsic factors such as pH (being too acidic) and increasing temperature exposure.

The consequences of ocean acidification are not limited to marine life. We have been inexplicably connected to the ocean, we have utilized it for recreation, transportation, medicine, and most importantly food.

It is estimated, we consume approximately 1.5 billion fish each year. A decline in fish availability could have severe economic and social implications for us.

How can we ensure the reversal of this issue?

A most effective measure to combat this problem is to decrease carbon pollution.

Other solutions have been proposed to slow the acidification process or protect their environments — mainly coral reefs.

Although, these are mostly bandaged solutions unable to recover the situation. Unfortunately, reducing carbon pollution is a challenge because it involves many factors.

Individuals can act their roles to limit their carbon footprint. Reducing your carbon pollution is simple if you unplug the appliances after use.

Many websites may help you to calculate your unique carbon footprint and offer easy solutions to help bring that number down.

The individual effort is not insignificant at all. A collective effort may potentially make a great impact.

It is high time; we work together to reduce pollution or acquire new technologies that can reduce the world’s current carbon footprints.

Ocean acidification and marine ecosystem
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